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New Sharon woman with broken ankle rescued from Tumbledown

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Rescuers carry an injured hiker off Tumbledown Saturday morning. (Photo courtesy of Jeremy O’Neil)

TOWNSHIP 6 – A New Sharon woman on the loop trail on Tumbledown Mountain fell and broke her ankle Saturday, resulting in firefighters, Maine Game Wardens and members of other agencies mobilizing to transport her back down the mountain.

According to a statement released by Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Communications Director Matt Latti, Amelia Hutchinson, 30 of New Sharon, was hiking up the loop trail on Tumbledown Mountain with her two children, ages 10 and 8 at approximately 11 a.m. Saturday morning when they came to a trail that was impassable due to ice. The family turned around and was heading back down the loop trail when Hutchinson slipped and fell down a sleep slope, striking a tree and breaking her ankle.

According to an email from Phillips Fire Department Deputy Chief Jeremy O’Neil, the injured hiker was located below the iron ladder that allows access to “Fat Man’s Misery,” near the top of the mountain’s west peak.

Firefighters from the Phillips, Weld, East Dixfield and Wilton departments, Maine Game Wardens, Forest Service, NorthStar EMS and members of North Franklin Search and Rescue all responded to the scene, assembling near the trailhead with snowmachines and rescue toboggans. An effort to rescue Hutchinson with a Maine Forest Service helicopter was called off due to high winds, requiring rescuers to transport the hiker off the mountain in a sled.

O’Neil said that the trail conditions required rescuers to use ropes to lower the hiker over several sections of snow and ice-covered trail. Five separate belay maneuvers were conducted by rescuers during a carry-out that O’Neil said lasted five hours.

Hutchinson was transported off the mountain with no additional injuries reported.

(Photo by Maine Warden Service)
(Photo by Maine Warden Service)
(Photo courtesy of Jeremy O’Neil)

 

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