Talk to address state lynx population

2 mins read
Mark with a baby lynx.
Mark McCollough with a baby lynx.
The Canada lynx photo above was taken somewhere west of Baxter Park by Kyle Lima, a high school student.
The Canada lynx photo above was taken somewhere west of Baxter Park by Kyle Lima, a high school student.

FARMINGTON – Mark McCollough, lead biologist for the Canada lynx with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, will be speaking about the lynx population in Maine on May 13, at 7 p.m. in UMF Robert’s C23 classroom. The event is sponsored by the Western Maine Audubon and the public is invited to attend.

Maine is one of the few states in the lower 48 states that supports a breeding population of Canada lynx. Lynx are found also in northern Minnesota, Montana, Idaho, Washington, the greater Yellowstone ecosystem, and Colorado. In 2000 lynx were listed as Threatened by the USFWS in the lower 48 states. There are no standard methods available to assess lynx populations. They are reclusive animals that have large home ranges, thus their populations are difficult to assess over a large area. Nevertheless, northern Maine is believed to have the largest population of lynx in the lower 48 states (at least several hundred animals).

McCollough will be discussing the status of the lynx in Maine and challenges to their future. How have changes in Maine’s forest industry affect lynx and their habitat? Why have lynx recently been documented breeding in parts of western Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont? Why has there been so much concern about trapping and Canada lynx? How will a warming climate affect lynx and their habitat? Why is there no recovery plan for the Canada lynx?

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